A Typical Day at Camp

Each day at camp, our activities are built around the “right of the day,” one of the rights or articles from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Although there’s really no such thing as a “typical” day at Peacebuilders Camp, each day includes:

  • Introducing the right that we’ll be focusing on
  • Discussing the day’s right, including identifying what groups are likely to have limited access to that right
  • Welcoming a guest speaker or taking a field trip to meet someone who is working to expand access to that right
  • Participating in an activity or service project that has to do with that right
  • A planned adventure, recreational activities, and/or unstructured free time with options for sports, games, crafts, and hanging out with new friends

Wake up time is between 7 – 8 am, depending on the day’s activities. We eat a continental breakfast as a community and campers have time to prep for the day.

We eat other meals prepared by camp staff at the Fuller House or share meals with the Koinonia Farm community in the Dining Hall. Sometimes we have a picnic or specially-prepared meal if our activities take us off campus for most of the day.

Adventures and recreational activities that campers have experienced in the past include whitewater rafting, hiking, paddling, rock climbing, swimming at a pool or lake, and playing Goalball, soccer, Ultimate frisbee, and basketball. Crafts like fair trade jewelry-making, origami-folding, bracelet-weaving, and peace fan-making are always an option during free time, as are board and card games. Peacebuilders Camp also has a library of books about peacemakers that campers can read, and campers can take walks around the farm to visit the animals or enjoy the farm’s playground area.

In addition, campers have the opportunity to share their talents with each other. Past camp sessions have included a talent show or art exhibition. Some campers have even started impromptu dance parties.

At the end of each day, campers join closing circle for storytelling about peacemaking heroes, a “kudos circle” to offer gratitude to each other, and planning for the next day’s activities. After time for showers, lights-out is around 10 pm each evening.

Here are a few examples of specific days at camp from previous years:

Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression (Article 19)

  • Discussion of freedom of expression, the many ways that thoughts and opinions can be expressed, and who may get left out of that right
  • Conversation with community activists, including the Roving Listeners from Macon, whose work supports free expression through various media
  • Choice of workshops: photography, videography, writing
  • Excursion into Americus with the Roving Listeners to interview townspeople and invite them to share their opinions and thoughts
  • Afternoon free time
  • Evening storytelling about peacemaking heros who support the right to freedom of expression

Right to a Fair Wage (Article 23)

  • Discussion of the right to work and to a fair wage, and who may not have access to that right
  • Interactive game illustrating the reality of wage disparities
  • Field trips to Café Campesino coffee roastery to learn about fair trade coffee and to Rudy’s Happy Patch, where people with mental illness are employed
  • Snacks and relaxation at Café Campesino
  • Free time with the option of making coffee bean jewelry
  • Evening storytelling about heroes of the labor movement

Right to Enjoy the Arts (Article 27)

  • Discussion of the right to enjoy the arts, why art is important, and who may be denied the right to enjoy the arts
  • Small group discussions of videos about projects that give different groups of marginalized people the chance to create or enjoy the arts
  • Workshop with Jennie Lobato from drawchange, collaborating on a mural and discussing Jennie’s work bringing art to children in homeless shelters
  • Afternoon free time with arts and crafts
  • Evening artists’ showcase

Right to Rest and Leisure (Article 24)

  • Discussion of the right to rest and leisure, the right to participate in sports, and who may experience barriers to that right, including people with limited mobility or others who are differently abled
  • Sports activities at Georgia Southwestern Southwestern State University’s gym with Paralympic athletes and adaptive rock climbers
  • Lunch at the GSW cafeteria
  • Swimming at the GSW pool
  • Evening movie night